WISE Books


Submitted 2 years ago
Created by
Lisa and Lisa of the Book Jam

Some great books that help us all understand the important work of WISE

April is National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. And, since prevention begins with awareness, we use this opportunity to highlight books that might help you think about sexual violence and its effects. We promise each of these books is a great book in its own right; we just unite them here because they each in some way help us think about how to prevent violence in both words and deeds. They also provide an excuse to once again highlight the important work of WISE -- our local organization dedicated to ending gender-based violence through survivor-centered advocacy, prevention, education, and mobilization for social change.

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2017) - We could call this a follow-up to her best selling We Should All Be Feminists . The first mused; this is more direct.  Enjoy.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2014) - A brief treatise of why men and women should be proud to be feminists by an amazing writer. (Makes a great graduation or birthday gift for your favorite older teen.) We include both of Ms. Adichie's books in this post because we believe that if we could all be feminists, many factors leading to sexual assault would be alleviated, ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty (2014)  – Buckle up your backpacks and get ready for playground politics and modern parenting. The lives of three mothers converge on the first day of kindergarten at an upscale elementary school in coastal Australia. Observant, humorous, and also surprising, this “un-putdownable” book explores the lies that we all tell ourselves and each other. Part mystery (someone ends up dead, but who?), part social commentary (in that it bravely explores the very serious issue of domestic abuse), part page-turner, this book is sure not to disappoint. Please note that a  portion of this review was initially published on the Book Jam on December 29, 2014).~ Lisa Cadow

The Distance Between Us: YA version by Reyna Grande (2017) - This book seems especially important with all the recent talk about walls along the US border and hatred towards illegal immigrants. Ms. Grande has adapted he memoir into this book for young adults. In it, she tells of her life as a toddler in an impoverished town in Mexico, her three attempts to cross into the USA with a coyote as a young child, her life in LA as an illegal immigrant, how her family gained legal status and how she managed college. This is not for the faint of heart due to themes of physical abuse  and complicated relationships with parents who are always leaving. But, it is important to be informed, and this book will put faces on any poltical discussions about immigration the teens in your life might encounter.  ~ Lisa Christie

Quicksand by Malin Persson Giolito (2017) - This was truly and amazing thriller. (And, it was named best Swedish crime novel of the year, and well reviewed by the NYTimes.) For fans of court room dramas, we are not sure you can do better than this take of a teen accused of planning and executing, with her boyfriend, a mass murder of her classmates. The boyfriend died during the mass shooting, so she alone remains on trial. As her story unfolds, you can reflect on parenting, teenage life, immigration and contemporary Sweden. Why do we include it in this post? Because part of teen life means dealing with sexuality and pressure and sometimes date rape. Or, you can just enjoy a well-told (or at least well translated) story. ~ Lisa Christie

Behind Closed Doors by BA Paris (2017) - This thriller about a completely creepy psychopath and the wife he has trapped inside his life will probably be a better movie than book, but it still had me wondering "WTF?" as I read it in one fell swoop. read it if you want to explore how not all abuse is physical.

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur (2015) - Kaur's book of poetry has been a best-seller since it was released by Andews McMeel Publishing in 2015. Kaur's powerful words resonate with women of all ages. Her first book includes short, deeply affecting poems and observations written entirely in lower case and with no punctuation except an occasional period.  Kaur divides this, her first book that includes her own line drawings, into four sections: the hurting, the loving, the breaking, and the healing.  The following complete poem, from "the hurting" section of "Milk and Honey" illustrates how much she can accomplish with very few words: "you were so afraid, of my voice, i decided to be, afraid of it too." We are including this title in today's post because her work unapologetically addresses difficult women's issues such as abandonment, self-doubt, exploitation, abuse, and physical shame. But she also blooms when she writes of love, acceptance, and triumph.  Kaur is a 24-year-old artist, poet, and performer who was born in India but who now lives with her family in Canada. Don't miss her work, she has a lot to say - and don't forget to pass it on when you're done. ~Lisa Cadow

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (2017) - As Book Jam readers know, we love this fresh, enlightening, and spectacular book about the black lives lost at the hands of police every year in the USA. Starr Carter, the teen Ms. Thomas has created to put faces n the statistics straddles two worlds - that of her poor black neighborhood and that of her exclusive school on the other side of town. She believes she is doing a pretty good job maintaining the differing realities of her life until she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood friend by a police officer. How does that relate to this post? One of the main characters must navigate an aggressively abusive relationship. 

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